New Testament, its Structure, Content, and Theology

This New Testament Survey class exists to teach our minds with biblical truth, integrate these facts with our beliefs, and then challenge us to be changed, individually and corporately.

This class is part of the Academy Program

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About this Class

This New Testament Survey class exists to teach our minds with biblical truth, integrate these facts with our beliefs, and then challenge us to be changed, individually and corporately. To be trained in order to be transformed. It is designed so that you can use or even teach the material in your own setting. People who are biblically literate are one of the church's greatest needs.

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  • Skill Level:
    Intermediate
  • Length:
    26 hours
  • Price:
    FREE
  • Institution:
    BiblicalTraining
  • Subject:
    New Testament
  • Language:
    English

Lectures

1

Introduction to the Biblical Training Institute

2

How the Bible was written, emphasizing the issue of trusting the Bible, harmonization, and what is called the "Synoptic Problem."

3

Inspiration, its meaning and scope (inerrancy, plenary inspiration, infallibility), what it does not entail, and why I believe Scripture is inspired.

4

Covers the areas of canonization (how we received the books we have in the New Testament), transmission (how they came to us through the centuries), and translations (why are there so many and why they are different).

5

We begin the story of Jesus' life by studying the gospel written by Mark, looking at John the Baptist, Jesus' baptism (Messiah; Suffering Servant), the Kingdom of God, people's reaction to Jesus, the Son of Man, and parables.

6

Emphasis on Jesus' understanding of discipleship, what it means to "Deny yourself," and how this impacts our understanding of sanctification, perseverance of the saints, and carnality.

7

Jesus discusses the signs warning about the destruction of the temple and what will characterize his return to earth at the end of time.

8

In this lesson we conclude our study of the gospel of Mark and Jesus' life. We will emphasize Jesus' Last Supper and how the church has understood it, as well as Jesus' death and the theological significance of the "atonement."

9

Having covered the basic story of Jesus' life in Mark, in this lesson we look at two specific teachings in Matthew, namely the virgin birth and its ramifications on our world-view, and the Beatitudes, the first part of the Sermon on the Mount.

10

In this second lesson on Matthew we will finish the Sermon on the Mount with special emphasis on the Lord's Prayer

11

In this lesson we will summarize the gospel written by Luke (temptation, the sinful woman, discipleship) with an emphasis on material that he alone includes (the Parable of the Good Samaritan)

12

We will pay special attention to John's presentation of Jesus as God and the many "proofs" of his divinity (with emphasis on the Prologue and the I Am sayings). We will also talk about John's use of the phrase "believe into."

13

In the second half of John we will focus on the Upper Room Discourse, the nature of servanthood, the Holy Spirit, and Jesus' "High Priestly Prayer."

14

The first part of Acts is the story of Peter and the expansion of the church from Jerusalem, to Judea, and the beginning of the movement to the ends of the earth. We will also talk about the significance of "tongues" as well as the "kerygma."

15

Paul begins his first missionary journey through Asia Minor (modern-day Turkey), and writes his letter to the Galatians, and we close with the Jerusalem Council (Acts 15).

16

In Paul's Second Missionary Journey he travels through Asia Minor to Corinth. We will look at his two letters to the Thessalonian church with an emphasis on his basic teaching to new converts and Jesus' return.

17

We will look quickly at Paul's Third Missionary Journey and then center on the first part of his first letter to the Corinthian church as he deals with divisions in the church, immorality, church discipline, and lawsuits.

18

There's a lot to cover in this lesson, issues of marriage, divorce, remarriage, spiritual gifts, our resurrection, the intermediate state (what happens to us between death and the final judgment), and finally the whole issue of money and giving.

19

Introduction to the letter, and discussion of Paul's doctrine of sin, salvation, righteousness, and faith.

20

Discussion of life after conversion (reconciliation, sin, sanctification, the Holy Spirit), and the relationship between Jews and Gentiles

Pages

Meet the Professors

President

Frequently Asked Questions

Who are the programs intended for?

The Foundations program is intended for everyone, regardless of biblical knowledge. The Academy program is intended for those who would like more advanced studies. And the Institute program is intended for those who want to study seminary-level classes.

Do I need to take the classes in a specific order?

In the Foundations and Academy programs, we recommend taking the classes in the order presented, as each subsequent class will build on material from previous classes. In the Institute program, the first 11 classes are foundational. Beginning with Psalms, the classes are on specific books of the Bible or various topics.

Do you offer transfer credit for completing a certificate program?

At this time, we offer certificates only for the classes on the Certificates page. While we do not offer transfer credit for completing a certificate program, you will be better equipped to study the Bible and apply its teachings to your life.