New Testament Survey – Gospels

Gain a detailed overview of the gospels.

About this Class

This is the first part of an introductory course to the New Testament, covering the books Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. The synopsis Dr. Stein refers to the Synopsis of the Four Gospels, English Edition, published by the American Bible Society. You can click here to order it.

The lecture notes you can download (to the right) are for both NT Survey I and II.

Thank you to Charles Campbell and Fellowship Bible Church for writing out the lecture notes for both sections of Stein's NT Survey class (to the right). Note that they do not cover every lecture.

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  • Skill Level:
    Seminary
  • Length:
    21 hours
  • Price:
    FREE
  • Institution:
    The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
  • Subject:
    New Testament
  • Language:
    English

Lectures

1

Discussion of the similarities and differences in the accounts of Jesus' life in the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke.

2

The Gospel of Mark is shorter than the other Gospels and some of the grammar and theology is unique. There are also significant similarities bewteen Mark and the Gospels of Matthew and Luke.

3

Discussion of the extensive similarities between the Gospels of Matthew and Luke, including the likely existence of a "Q" document.

4

Some time passed between the ascension of Jesus and the writing of the Gospels because there was no need for a written account while the eyewitnesses were still alive and in that culture oral tradition was the primary method of preserving history. Form critics also note that it is likely that it is likely that many of the narratives and sayings of Jesus circulated independently.

5

Form criticism is the method of classifying literature by literary pattern and determine its original form and historical context in order to interpret its meaning accurately.

6

Redaction criticism focuses on evaluating how a writer has seemingly shaped and molded a narrative to express his theological goals.

7

Studying the background and theological emphases of the Gospel of Mark helps us to understand the central message of his Gospel.

8

Studying the background and theological emphases of the Gospel of Mark helps us to understand the central message of his Gospel.

9

Studying the background and theological emphases of the Gospel of Luke helps us to understand the central message of his Gospel.

10

Studying the background and theological emphases of the Gospel of John helps us to understand the central message of his Gospel.

11

By studying the background and comparing the text of the synoptic gospels, we can be confident of their authenticity.

12

In order to understand Jesus' teaching, it is important to understand how he uses exaggeration and determine when he is using exaggeration to make a point.

13

The Gospels record how Jesus used different literary forms to communicate his teachings. This class was taught by a teaching assistant of Dr. Stein's but his name was not provided. 

14

Jesus told parables to communicate with people. It's important to know how to interpret parables to accurately understand what Jesus was trying to teach. At different times in history, people have used different paradigms to interpret parables.

15

Jesus told parables to communicate with people. It's important to know how to interpret parables to accurately understand what Jesus was trying to teach. At different times in history, people have used different paradigms to interpret parables.

16

Jesus used different literary forms to communicate with people. It's important to know how to interpret these literary forms, including parables, to accurately understand what Jesus was trying to teach.

17

The kingdom of God is God's kingdom invading the earthly kingdom. There is a tension between the "now" and "not yet."

18

Jesus' teaching about the fatherhood of God reveals for us a tension between reverence and intimacy.

19

The ethical teachings of Jesus are scattered throughout the Gospels and sometimes seem to be contradictory. He emphasized the need for a new heart and the importance of loving God and our "neighbor."

20

We learn about who Jesus was by examining what he said and what he did.

Pages

Meet the Professors

Professor of New Testament

Frequently Asked Questions

Who are the programs intended for?

The Foundations program is intended for everyone, regardless of biblical knowledge. The Academy program is intended for those who would like more advanced studies. And the Institute program is intended for those who want to study seminary-level classes.

Do I need to take the classes in a specific order?

In the Foundations and Academy programs, we recommend taking the classes in the order presented, as each subsequent class will build on material from previous classes. In the Institute program, the first 11 classes are foundational. Beginning with Psalms, the classes are on specific books of the Bible or various topics.

Do you offer transfer credit for completing a certificate program?

At this time, we offer certificates only for the classes on the Certificates page. While we do not offer transfer credit for completing a certificate program, you will be better equipped to study the Bible and apply its teachings to your life.