Year of Jubilee

holy Year. A Roman Catholic institution, based only indirectly on the Levitical Year of Jubilee (Lev. 25), but rather an extension of the pilgrimage movement and the system of indulgences,* first observed in 1300 under Boniface VIII, apparently by spontaneous popular demand. Boniface in the bull Antiquorum fida relatio offered plenary indulgences to all pilgrims to Rome who met the conditions within the year. Intended to be celebrated each century, the next jubilee was proclaimed for 1350 by the Avignonese Pope Clement VI at the request of the Romans. Urban VI in 1389 reduced the interval to thirty-three years, and in 1470 Paul II further diminished it to twenty-five-the present interval. In 1500 Alexander VI extended the indulgence to all churches in the year following the jubilee, until Easter Saturday, though subsequent practice has varied. A jubilee indulgence was proclaimed throughout Christendom by Paul VI for 1 January to 29 May 1966, later extended to 8 December, to mark the completion of Vatican II.