William Romaine

1714-1795. Evangelical Anglican. Born in Hartlepool and educated at Houghton-le-Spring Grammar School, Durham, he graduated from Christ Church, Oxford, was ordained in the Church of England, and served curacies at Lewtrenchard, Devon, and Banstead, Surrey. He was chaplain to Daniel Lambert in his year of office as lord mayor of London in 1741. One of his absorbing interests was the Hebrew language, and he spent much time preparing a new edition of the Hebrew Dictionary of Marios de Calasio (d.1620). Moving to London in 1748, he became lecturer at St. George's, Billingsgate, and later at St. Dunstan-in-the-West. By this time he was a convinced Evangelical and the friend of George Whitefield, the countess of Huntingdon, and others. Excelling as a preacher, he attracted large crowds in London and on preaching tours in the country. He wished to see the Gospel penetrate the whole church and nation, and organized days of prayer to this end. In 1766 he was appointed rector of St. Anne's Blackfriars, and remained there until his death. He also continued his lectureship at St. Dunstan's. His message was a warm, Calvinistic evangelicalism. His most famous work is the trilogy, The Life, Walk, and Triumph of Faith (1771-94). A new edition with biography (ed. P. Toon) was published in 1970.