The Torgau Articles

1576. Twelve in number, these were adopted by the Lutheran theologians of Germany as “opinions as to how the dissensions prevailing among the theologians of the Augsburg Confession may, according to the Word of God, be agreed upon and settled in a Christian manner.” The Torgau Book was submitted to the Lutheran princes (about twenty-five); most of the theologians in their territories approved it. Because some of them objected to its length, James Andreae* prepared an Epitome. James Andreae, Martin Chemnitz, and Nicholas Selneccer met at Cloister Bergen in March 1577. They met there again in May 1577, when they were joined by Andreas Musculus, Christopher Carnerus, and David Chytraeus. Here they completed the revision of the Torgau Book, known also as the Belgic Book or the “Solid Declaration” or the “Formula of Concord.”* The Torgau Articles or the Epitome were also approved. The twelve articles deal with: (1) Original Sin; (2) Free Will; (3) the Righteousness of Faith Before God; (4) Good Works; (5) the Law and the Gospel; (6) the Third Use of the Law; (7) the Lord's Supper; (8) the Person of Christ; (9) the Descent of Christ into Hell; (10) Church Rites; (11) God's Eternal Foreknowledge (Predestination) and Election; (12) Other Factions (Heresies) and Sects.