Taizé Community

Founded in 1940 by the present prior, Roger Schutz, when he began to receive Jewish and other refugees into his home at Taizé in Burgundy. In 1942 the Gestapo forced him away, but in 1944 he returned with three brothers to begin the common life. By 1949 the monastic tradition took hold with the first seven brothers pledging themselves to celibacy, authority, and common property. More than seventy men from different Christian traditions from Europe and the Americas now make up the community, and a group of Franciscans and Eastern Orthodox monks have come to live with them. From 1968 Roman Catholics have joined, and the prior and a few brothers spend one month each year in Rome. Truly ecumenical, there are solid links with Rome, Constantinople, and the World Council of Churches (where brothers are on the staff). For social development, brothers go in small groups to many nations, notably Latin America and Africa, to live and work among varying situations ranging from scientific efforts to dishwashing. Wherever they are, brothers pray at appointed times thrice daily. Taizé has become a place of pilgrimage. Youth assemblies meet there regularly.