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Tadmor

TADMOR tăd’ môr (Heb. תַּדְמֹ֖ר), the city of palm trees, later made famous in Gr. and Lat. history as Palmyra, was an ancient military outpost, trading center, and customs station located in the Syrian desert, half-way between Damascus and the upper Euphrates River. It was a large and pleasant oasis with wonderfully fine mineral springs, fertile soils, and many gardens and palm groves—the only supply station of any consequences on the shorter trade route between Babylonia and Syria. Tadmor’s inhabitants are mentioned in cuneiform inscrs. of the 19th and 18th centuries b.c., and early in the 11th cent. in the annals of Tiglath-pileser I of Assyria, who attacked the Aramaeans who lived there. The Biblical narratives inform us that when King Solomon took N Syria along the Beqa’a and Orontes Valleys as far N as Hamath, he not only built “store cities” in the Hamath area, but also “built [or rebuilt] Tadmor in the wilderness” (2 Chron 8:3, 4) to protect the trade routes, and serve th