Particular Baptists

So called because of their belief in a particular atonement in which Christ died only for His elect people. Their origins in England can be traced to the adoption of believers' baptism by a group of Calvinistic London separatists in 1633. They retained the theological emphasis of the church from which they seceded and remained independent or congregational in polity. By 1660 there were 131 Particular Baptist churches in England. The first Particular Baptist Confession was published in 1644 and has been revised on numerous occasions, the last being in 1966. Apart from baptism, the theological emphasis of the confessions has always been Reformed. The Baptist Missionary Society was formed in 1792 by the Northamptonshire Association of Particular Baptist Churches at the call of William Carey,* so initiating the modern missionary movement. John Bunyan* and C.H. Spurgeon* were also associated with the Particular Baptists.