New Testament Survey: Acts-Revelation, by Timothy Schreiner

A study of the Acts to Revelation in the framework of the history of the early church. We are missing a few lectures that we hope to record the next time Dr. Schreiner teaches the class. These include lecture numbers 2 and 11, the lecture covering Acts chapters 16-22 and 1 Thessalonians, and the lecture covering Revelation chapter 6.

You may download Dr. Schreiner's complete course outline By clicking on the Resource link and then the Class Outline link. An outline for each lecture displays when you click on the Outline tab on each lecture page.

Dr. Schreiner has developed a system for exegesis. The "Flow and Tracing" handout gives you some information about how he does it. Some lectures include audio of Dr. Schreiner applying this method to specific passages. Dr. Schreiner recommends that you read the chapter in his book, "Interpreting the Pauline Epistles" along with this handout before you try this process.

 

ACTS

1 Introduction to Acts - Acts is a continuation of the gospel of Luke, which is a historical account of the life and ministry of Jesus. Acts begins with the 40 days that Jesus was on earth after his resurrection, and continues with his ascension and the work of the Holy Spirit in the early church.

2 The Gospel is Proclaimed - This lecture was not recorded. We hope to include it the next time Dr. Schreiner teaches the class. - Acts Chapter 1 is an account of Pentecost and the first times the apostles proclaim gospel publicly.

3 Kerygma in Acts - The kerygma is the proclamation of the gospel to nonbelievers. The first presentations were made to people who were familiar with the teachings of the Old Testament. (Begins on page 6 of the outline)

4 The Gospel Proclaimed Outside Jerusalem - The kerygma is the proclamation of the gospel to nonbelievers. The first presentations were made to people who were familiar with the teachings of the Old Testament. Steven’s speech and Paul’s conversion are significant events. (Begins on page 6 of the outline under Acts: Outline Summary, point I, F.) (43:40)

5 The Gospel is Proclaimed to the Gentiles - Description of the expansion of the gospel to the gentiles. - ROMANS THROUGH THESSALONIANS

ROMANS THROUGH THESSALONIANS

6 2 Thessalonians & 1st Corinthians - Beginning in 2 Thessalonians chapter 2, Paul calls us to watch for the second coming of Jesus by being aware that there will be a great falling away from the faith in the body of Christ and the Lawless One will appear. When God calls us, his calling creates life. (43:16)

7 I Corinthians Part 1 - God chose not the wise, powerful or noble, but the foolish, weak and despised so that we would know that our relationship with God is based on what Christ did, not what we do. Paul boasts in the power of God, not the wisdom or eloquence of his arguments. The only way we know about God is when the Spirit reveals him to us.

8 I Corinthians Part 2 - The core problem of the Corinthians is pride. God turns everything for our benefit, even things that cause pain or death. The fight of faith is to believe this, even when circumstances are difficult. Only God can judge a person’s relationship to God. (43:36)

9 I Corinthians (part 3) - It’s better to be cheated than to take a fellow believer to court. If you are a fully devoted follower of Christ, your behavior will show it. (44:35)

10 I Corinthians (part 4) - Paul believes in cultural flexibility and contextualization. Paul uses the example of a race as a picture of be motivated to live well. He is saved and needs to live in a way to be saved. Whether or not to eat meat offered to idols is still a significant issue in some cultures. (41:23)

11 I Corinthians (part 5) - Content missing at this time. 1 Corinthians chapters 12-16, 2 Corinthians and Romans chapter 1.

12 Romans (part 1) - The first of a three-part overview of Paul's epistle to the Romans.

13 Romans (part 2) - Romans 4 tells us what kind of faith Abraham had that was saving faith. You are not saved by working for God, but by believing in God. Hope is confident, sure expectation. Paul’s main rhetorical question is, “Can the law transform us?” His implied answer is "no!" (43:03)

14 Romans (part 3) - The law doesn’t give life because commands don’t transform us. Romans 8 says we need the Spirit to transform us. The witness of the Spirit that we are his children is a mystical sense and evidence of our obedience. Paul says all the promises for relationship to God are for the gentiles as well as the Jews. God is in charge of everything. (44:25)

15 Philippians - Christ is the very image of the invisible God. He partakes of his essence. Jesus is preeminent, because he’s God and he’s the reconciler of all things. Jesus is Lord of Creation and Lord of the Church. Paul calls the Philippians to unity. (46:43)

16 Ephesians - Summary of main themes in Ephesians. The first three chapters communicate who and what we are in Christ. Chapters 4-6 is the practical outworking. Paul equates maturity with doctrinal purity and stability, not being swayed by every idea. The Christian life isn’t mathematical because it’s a relationship with the Spirit. (43:54)

PASTORAL EPISTLES

17 Authorship of the Pastorals - Your view of authorship of biblical documents and how you translate those documents depends quite a bit on your presuppositions. Some people think that because of the vocabulary and the way some subjects are addressed in the Pastoral epistles that Paul did not write them. However, others are convinced that Paul wrote them and offer responses to objections that others have raised. (42:24) This lecture was given by a teaching assistant of Dr. Schreiner's because he had planned to be out of town.

18 Pastoral Epistles - God wants to work in our hearts so we are full of love for him and others. Paul gives his testimony as an example that anyone can be saved. God desires to save all, and he elects some. Elders are described as people of character who lead and teach. In Titus, the ethical exhortations are anchored in the gospel. In 2 Timothy, Paul calls on Timothy to suffer for the gospel.

GENERAL EPISTLES

19 Hebrews: Introductory Matters - We should think of Hebrews as a sermon. The warning passages are exhortations following theological teaching. It was probably not written by Paul. The book was written to Hebrew Christians to warn them against committing apostasy.

20 Hebrews (part 2) - Christ is more important than Moses. Warning passages encourage us not to drift away or harden our hearts. Since Jesus was fully human, he experienced the full range of temptation, but never gave in. (43:55)

21 Hebrews (part 3) - The main points in the book of Hebrews beginning with chapter 6. Jesus was a priest in the order of Melchizedek because he was superior to the Levites. Christ’s sacrifice is better than the animal sacrifices because it is once for all. The sacrifices are good because they are a shadow and an image of what is coming, but the sacrifices are temporary and imperfect. (43:55)

22 Hebrews (part 4) - The author of Hebrews concludes by exhorting people to put into practice the theological truths he has just explained.

23 James - Defining questions about the content and origin of the epistle of James. (43:01)

24 James (part 2) - Summary of the teaching of James on justification and wisdom. (41:58)

25 1 Peter - Peter’s call to look forward to our future inheritance and live as God’s people. (42:35)

26 1 Peter (part 2) - Flow assignment 1 Peter 2:18-25 - Peter calls followers of Jesus to persevere by responding to suffering in a godly way. (44:48)

27 1 John - Concluding verses in 1 Peter and the epistle of 1 John. The purpose of John’s epistles is to give people assurance of their faith.

28 2 Peter and Jude - God has given us everything we need for life and godliness.

REVELATION

29 Revelation (part 1) - The purpose of Revelation is to encourage suffering saints. (44:47)

30 Revelation (part 2) - This lecture was cut short because of technical difficulties during the recording. The audio covers point III. Visions of God, points A and B, beginning with Revelation chapter 4. The next lecture begins at point IV. The Seven Seals, point D.

31 Revelation (part 3) - Main ideas in Revelation chapters 6-13.

32 Revelation (part 4) - Summary of the last days of judgment and then the creation of the new heavens and new earth. The time for this lecture was shortened to give students time to complete an in-class evaluation. (30:15)