Lucian of Antioch

c.240-312. Teacher and martyr. Born at Samosata of distinguished parents, he completed his education at Antioch. Though for a time under the censure of the church because of his theological views, he became the head of the theological school at Antioch and there made his impression. As an exegete he encouraged a literalistic interpretation of Scripture, and so opposed the allegorical methods of Origen. He accepted the preexistence of Christ, but insisted that this had not been from all eternity. Many of his students, who included Arius and Eusebius of Nicomedia, came to occupy the most important sees in the East, and as fellow-disciples of Lucian were sympathetic to Arius. Lucian is often called the father of Arianism.* He produced a very distinguished revision of the Septuagint. The Second Creed of Antioch (341) is reputed to have been written by him and, though this is probably not so, he may have had some connection with it. He was martyred at Nicomedia.