John Aylmer

1521-1594. Bishop of London. Educated at Cambridge through Henry Grey, duke of Suffolk, to whose daughter (Lady Jane Grey) he then became chaplain and tutor, he was appointed archdeacon of Stow in 1553, but was forced to flee to the Continent for his opposition to transubstantiation. There he assisted Foxe* in translating his Acts and Monuments into Latin. On his return to England he was chosen as one of the eight disputants against the Roman Catholics. He became archdeacon of Lincoln in 1562 and bishop of London in 1576. His arbitrary and unconciliatory disposition became apparent, and he was bitterly attacked in the Marprelate Tracts* for his exceptional severity in fining and imprisoning all who disagreed doctrinally, whether Puritan or Catholic. Similar in temperament to W. Laud,* he is to be commended for his learning and his discerning patronage of scholars. His only notable work was a reply to John Knox's Monstrous Regiment of Women.