Jerusalem Conference

1928. World missionary conference gathered on Mount of Olives at Easter 1928. It was the first conference held since the formation of the International Missionary Council,* which was itself the outgrowth of the World Missionary Conference at Edinburgh,* 1910. Its purpose was to reexamine the Christian mission in the light of the spread of secularism. The first globally representative assembly of non- Roman Christians, nearly one-quarter of the 231 members represented in full equality the churches of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The agenda included urbanization and industrialization in Asia and Africa, rural problems, race relations, war, medical work, religious education, relations between younger and older churches. Fears were expressed, especially by European representatives, that this agenda signified the triumph of the Social Gospel and might lead to syncretistic compromise. Some interpretative reports were given to keep the balance, but some evangelical societies withdrew from their respective national conferences, e.g., the China Inland Mission. The “Message” was drafted by William Temple and incorporated part of the statement prepared by the Lausanne Conference,* 1927. After acknowledging elements of truth in other religions, it affirmed that “Christ is our motive and Christ our end. We must give nothing less, and we can give nothing more.”

See Reports of the Jerusalem Meeting of the International Missionary Council (8 vols., 1928).