Isaac Barrow

1630-1677. Mathematician and Anglican divine. A royalist in politics, he traveled widely in Europe and the East (1655-59). Successively professor of Greek at Cambridge (1660), professor of geometry at Gresham College, and first Lucasian professor of mathematics at Cambridge (1663), he resigned in favor of his pupil, Isaac Newton,* and gave himself to theology. Charles II made him royal chaplain, D.D. by royal mandate, and master of Trinity (1672). He became vice-chancellor of Cambridge University in 1675. His theological works (ed. A. Napier, 1859) include A Treatise of the Pope's Supremacy, a skillful piece of controversial writing. His mathematical works (ed. W. Whewell, 1860) were highly esteemed in his day.