Hadrian Saravia

1531-1613. Anglican scholar. Born in Hesdin, Artois, to a Spanish Protestant, he was a drafter of the Belgic Confession and a refugee in Guernsey and England before returning to a chair of theology in Leyden (1582). Unsuccessful in persuading Elizabeth I of England to intervene more actively in the Netherlands, and finding his position untenable, Saravia returned to England in 1587 and became rector of Tattenhill the following year. Friendship with men like L. Andrewes* and R. Hooker* profoundly modified his Calvinism. Though firmly upholding the supremacy of Scripture, he insisted that no doctrinal changes would be introduced against the witness of the Fathers. He engaged in vigorous controversy with T. Beza* over divine-right Presbyterianism, argued powerfully for episcopacy, and attacked Calvin's views on Christ's descent into hell and predestination. Saravia received considerable preferment and was one of the OT translators of the Authorized Version as well as one of the first Protestant advocates of foreign missions.