George of Cappadocia

d.361. Bishop of Alexandria. An Arian of the Acacian school (see Acacius), he was intruded into the see of Alexandria from 357, following Athanasius's flight the previous year. His arrival was accompanied by soldiers, and the cruelty that had earlier marked the eviction of the orthodox from their churches in favor of the Arians was now resumed by George. Nor was he disliked any less by the pagans of Alexandria, against whom his measures were equally violent. His tyranny ultimately brought about his death. In 358 he was rescued only with difficulty when a mob seized him. He was forced to flee and probably did not return for about a year. But when in 361 news of Julian's accession reached the city, a mob again seized him-and killed him some weeks later. Described by his enemies as unlearned, George nevertheless had an extensive library, according to Julian. Despite his cruelty, even his enemies conceded that he was a man of resolution and action.