Enos Nuttall

1842-1916. First archbishop of the West Indies. English-born, he went to Jamaica first in 1862 as a Methodist probationer, but in 1866 was ordained in the Anglican Church. He first appears as a man with sensible suggestions in the complex negotiations surrounding disestablishment in 1870. Ten years later he was elected bishop of Jamaica. He became archbishop in 1893. His interests cover the range of contemporary problems. He regarded the British Empire as, on the whole, a good thing, advocated an institutional connection with Canterbury, recruited clergy first in England, but in 1893 founded the first diocesan theological college in Jamaica. He advocated a modified system of public education, including secondary schools, with religious instruction at all levels. He pressed also for agricultural education. Eminently Victorian, he regarded Jamaican revivalism with suspicion, but blamed the church for its existence. He pioneered in the founding of a church nursing home in 1893. A competent man, convinced of the virtues of British culture, but without racial inhibitions, he was primarily concerned with individual rather than social problems.