Edward The Confessor

1003-1066. Son of Ethelred II (“the Unready”), he was taken into exile by his father and resided at the Norman court until recalled by his half-brother Hardicanute in 1041. Thereafter he was evidently regarded as heir to the English throne, largely through the influence of Earl Godwin, whose daughter he married in 1045. He preferred his Norman advisers to the Saxons, however, and one of his favorites, Robert of Jumieges, became archbishop of Canterbury in 1051. Civil war seemed imminent, but the king's chief adversary, Godwin, regarded as representing the cause of the nationalists, fled into exile. Soon a reconciliation was effected, the foreigners fled, and the influence of Godwin followed by that of his son was complete. The king suffered further blows to his pride, his failing health caused his absence from the consecration of his new abbey of Westminster late in 1065, and just after the new year the charming, mild-mannered ascetic died. He was canonized in 1161.