Dok

DOK dŏk (Δωκ, corrupted to Δαγων, in Jos. Antiq. XVIII. viii. 1). DOCUS, dō’ cəs. A small fortress built (or rebuilt) by Ptolemy, the son of Abubus, a short distance NW of Jericho. The name of the ancient city survives in modern ’Ain Duq c. four m. NW of Jericho. The ancient site is identified with Jebel Qarantal. Simon Maccabeus and his sons Mattathias and Judas in making a circuit of the cities of the country were received at Dok by Ptolemy. After they had banqueted and had become drunk, Ptolemy’s men who were lying in wait arose and killed them (1 Macc 16:15). Dok was one of several fortresses guarding the routes into the central mountain region.

Bibliography

D. Baly, Geography of the Bible (1957), 201.

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1915)

A small fortress, "little stronghold" near Jericho (1 Macc 16:15), built by Ptolemy, son of Abubus, where he entertained and murdered his father-in-law nodetitle and his two sons. Josephus (Ant., XIII, viii, 1; BJ, I, ii, 3) calls the place Dagon and places it above Jericho. The name persists in Ain Duk with its copious springs of excellent water about 4 miles Northwest of Jericho. Some ancient foundations in the neighborhood are possibly those of Ptolemy’s fortress, but more probably of a Templars’ station which is known to have stood there as late as the end of the 13th century. For its importance in earlier Jewish history, see Smith, HGHL, 250, 251.