Daniel Wilson

1778-1858. Anglican bishop. Son of a rich London silk manufacturer, Wilson was intended for a business career, but experienced an evangelical conversion and decided to enter the ministry. He studied at St. Edmund Hall, Oxford, of which he was later vice-principal, and exercised several highly successful ministries, one of which was at St. Mary's, Islington (1824-32). Then through the influence of Charles Grant he was made bishop of Calcutta at the late age of fifty-four. He found the affairs of the diocese in confusion, but by unrelenting work and spiritual discipline restored order and established his influence over chaplains and missionaries alike. He waged war on the caste system, built Calcutta Cathedral and many new churches, secured in 1833 freedom of missionary activity from the control of the East India Company, and created two new sees (Madras and Bombay) which gave him metropolitan status over the whole of India. Vigorous, unbending, and determined to hold others to his own high standards, he helped the Anglican Church in India to grow in power, zeal, and esteem. He was in Serampore during the Mutiny, and died at Calcutta.