Bithron

BITHRON (bĭth'rŏn, rough country). A region in the tribe of Gad between the Jordan and Mahanaim. Mentioned only in 2Sam.2.29.


BITHRON bĭth’ rŏn (בִּתְרֹ֔ון, cleft, gully, or forenoon). The KJV and ASV treat “Bithron” as a place name (taken perhaps from the geographical feature) of a valley leading E from the Jordan through which Abner, commander of the army of Ishbosheth, and his men marched after crossing the Jordan toward Mahanaim following initial defeats by Joab, David’s commander (2 Sam 2:29). The RSV tr. it “forenoon,” being opposite of “night.” See W. R. Arnold, “The meaning of בִּתְרֹ֔ון,” AJSL, No. 28 (1911-12), 274-283.

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1915)

(ha-bithron; holen ten parateinousan, literally "the entire (land) extending"; 2Sa 2:29, "the Bithron," i.e. the gorge or groove): Does not seem to be a proper name; rather it indicates the gorge by which Abner approached Mahanaim. Buhl (GAP, 121) favors identification with Wady `Ajlun, along which in later times a Ro road connected `Ajlun and Mahanaim. Others (Guthe, Kurz. bib. Worterbuch, under the word) incline to Wady esh Sha`ib.