Beth Haran

BETH HARAM, BETH HARAN (bĕth' hā'răm, bĕth' hā'răn, house of the mountaineer). A fortified city built by the Gadites east of the Jordan (Num.32.36; Josh.13.27).


BETH-HARAM bĕth hâr’ əm (בֵּ֣ית הָרָם, house of height, KJV BETH-ARAM). A town allotted to the tribe of Gad at the division of Canaan among the Israelites (Josh 13:27). Doubtless the same as BETH-HARAN of Numbers 32:36. Taken from the Amorites, a high point E of the Jordan River in the Jordan valley, and fortified by the tribe of Gad to protect their families and cattle while they shared with the other tribes in the conquest W of Jordan. Believed to be the same site as Beth-aramphtha, a name used by the Syrians and mentioned by Josephus in his Antiquities. The site is now identified with the modern Tell Iktanu, eight m. NE of the mouth of the Jordan, S of the Wadi Heshban.

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1915)

An Amorite city taken and fortified by the Gadites (Jos 13:27; Nu 32:36; in the latter passage the name appears as Beth-haran, probably the original form). It corresponds to Bethramphtha of Josephus (Ant., XVIII, ii, 1), which, according to Eusebius, was the name used by the Syrians. Here was a palace of Herod (Ant., XVII, x, 6; BJ, II, iv, 2). Eusebius, Onomasticon says it was called Livias. Josephus says it was fortified by Herod Antipas, who called it Julias for the wife of Augustus (Ant., XVIII, ii, 1; BJ, II, ix, 1). The name would be changed to Julias when Livia, by the will of the emperor, was received into the Gens Julia. It is represented by Tell er-Rameh in Wady Chesban, about 6 miles East of Jordan.