Baldwin

d.1190. Archbishop of Canterbury from 1184. He was already archdeacon of Totnes when he decided to enter the Cistercian house at Ford in Dorset. He soon became abbot and then from 1180 was bishop of Worcester. His primacy was concerned with two major issues. First, his dispute with the monks of Christ Church, Canterbury, concerning the grant of revenues to the monks and their privileges in electing the archbishop. Baldwin, who wished to found a college of secular priests, was supported by the king, while the monks were upheld by the pope. Baldwin could count also on a general mood of hostility to the Black Monks, whom not only Cistercians regarded as relaxed. Then, too, Baldwin preached the Crusade following Saladin's capture of Jerusalem in 1187, and he himself went to the Holy Land, where he died. He had been saddened by the conduct of the Christian armies.