Augustus Caesar

AUGUSTUS CAESAR (ô-gŭs'tŭs sē'zêr). Gaius Octavius, whose male ancestors for four generations had the same name, was born in Rome in 63 b.c., and early became influential through his great-uncle Julius Caesar. He was studying quietly in Illyria when he heard of Caesar’s murder in 44. Hastening to Italy, he learned that Caesar had adopted him and made him his heir. Thus in his early manhood by skillful manipulation of his friends, he conquered his rival Antony at Actium. The beginning of the Roman Empire may be reckoned from that date—September 2, 31. By his adoption he had become “Caesar,” and now the Roman senate added the title “Augustus.” Although he preserved the forms of a republic, he gradually got all the power into his hands. He reigned till a.d. 14. Some of the secular histories omit the most important event in his reign—a Baby was born in Bethlehem! Augustus Caesar is mentioned just once in the NT (Luke.2.1).