The Healing of Our Wounds

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Lesson

God’s saving plan is to change us into persons who are both holy and whole.

Outline

The Healing of Our Wounds
 

A. Review and Introduction

B. The wounding effects of sin

C. The chief sources of our wounds

1. Our own sinful behaviors

2. The sinful behaviors of others

3. The realities of a fallen and dangerous world

D. The shape of our wounds

1. Bondages

2. Fears

3. Self-loathing

4. Inability to forgive

E. The God who heals: 'I am the Lord, who heals you.' (Exodus 15:26, Psalm 103:2-3)

F. God's grace as mending glue: The substantial healing of the total person (already but "not yet," Rev. 22:2)

G. Physical healing (James 5:16) and inner healing (Psalm 147:3)

H. Proven means of healing: The word, meditation and prayer, counselors, community and service

I. Wounded healers: Paul's "thorn" (2 Cor. 12:7-10), "weakness" (2 Cor. 4:7-12) and imperfection (Phil. 3:12-14)

J. Some helpful guides: Antony of Egypt (251-356), Henry Nouwen and David Benner

K. Summary: God’s saving plan is to change us into persons who are both holy and whole. We have continued our survey of the transformational dynamic by exploring the movement of the Spirit toward wholeness. The consequences of sin—whether ours or someone else’s, it makes no difference—are painful and damaging. But God is the Great Physician. Out of compassion for us in our suffering, and by his Spirit, he has initiated a healing and restorative ministry in the world. It is substantial, though never complete, and it encompasses both our physical needs and our inner wounds. The encouraging news is that each of us can serve Christ as wounded healers of others.

Duration

1 hour 1 min

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